Using jargon to sound smart? Science says you’re just insecure

I don’t know about you but I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve heard people in the startup world string meaningless words together.

“Enable best-of-breed convergence,” and “synthesize distributed users,” are just two of my favorite jargon-fuelled phrases — even if I don’t understand what they mean.

Why, oh, why do people feel the need to spout these meaningless, empty words? Well, according to one specific study, insecurity in the workplace may play a part.

The study, titled ‘Compensatory conspicuous communication: Low status increases jargon use,’ found a correlation between aspiring business professionals, who experienced low status (aka being at the bottom of the chain at work), would use more acronyms in their written communication.

[Read: 6 work phrases you need to drop if you want your team to like you]

Interestingly, the same study also found that lower-status individuals focused more on

Read More

When You Say There’s a Limited Pool of Black Talent, Here’s What You’re Revealing About Yourself


6 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


A few weeks ago, Charlie Scharf joined a list of executives who have revealed made it clear to their companies — and the public — that they have more work to do on their diversity and inclusion journey. The Wells Fargo CEO shared his views on the lack of representation at the bank, citing that there was “a very limited pool of Black talent to recruit from.” Scharf later issued an apology after swift media backlash, stating that it was “an insensitive comment reflecting my own unconscious bias.”  

Scharf is not the only executive to believe this to be true. “There just aren’t enough Black candidates.” “It’s not our organization’s issue, it’s clearly a pipeline issue.” “Look, I’m all for diverse talent, as long as they are good.” The underlying assumption being that we

Read More

The Science Behind Why Only One Nostril Clogs When You’re Sick

From Men’s Health

Being stuffed up sucks. Ever wonder why it seems like one nostril feels way more clogged than the other? It’s not just your imagination: There’s a scientific reason behind it.

Credit a physiological response called the nasal cycle, a process where your nostrils take turns sucking in more air, says Rachel Roditi, M.D., a surgeon in the division of otolaryngology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Here’s why your nostrils play tag team—and what you can do when one side’s all jammed up.

Why One Nostril Gets More Congested

Structures in both sides of your nose called inferior turbinates are responsible for warming and humidifying air before it reaches your lungs, says Dr. Roditi. This protects your lungs by reducing dryness and irritation.

That process is a lot of work. So your nose funnels its resources more to one side than the other to make the process more

Read More

HP says its face-tracking, heart-rate enabled VR headset knows when you’re overwhelmed

omnicept-edition-facemaskremoval-blackbg

The HP Omnicept Edition VR headset adds face tracking, eye tracking and heart rate in 2021.


HP

Imagine you’re training to be a pilot or a doctor, experiencing a simulation in VR with convincing images and tools that feel like the real thing. And not only do you get to know how you did afterwards, but you can see how you focused, what your pulse rate was and maybe even what you were feeling. 

VR headsets like Oculus Quest don’t look inwards to measure what we’re experiencing as we try new things, but some business-targeted VR headsets already have eye tracking to measure what a wearer might be looking at or interested in. The HP Omnicept, a new VR training platform announced today, goes further: It measures eye movement, face and lip movement, pupil size and even heart rate. It’s on target for release in 2021 and points to

Read More

You’re not getting a discount on your PS5, no matter what Walmart says

Click here to read the full article.

a close up of electronics: PS5 Preorder


© Provided by BGR
PS5 Preorder

  • Some Walmart customers may have received PS5 price discount alerts via email, advertising incredible price-matching deals.
  • Those emails were probably sent by mistake, as there are no official deals on PS5 hardware or games at this time.
  • The two PS5 models remain out of stock at Walmart and other retailers after selling out quickly a few days ago.

The PS5 sold out even before preorders were supposed to start last week; that’s how disorganized the launch event was. Some retailers jumped the gun and allowed buyers to preorder the PS5 and PS5 Digital Edition on Wednesday, right after Sony’s virtual press event. The available stock sold immediately, and many of the gamers who attempted to place their orders on Thursday, which was the original plan, were unable to secure a PS5.

Amazon then contacted buyers to tell

Read More

Anxious if smartphone not near? You’re not alone

Emma Scott Moran The Columbus Dispatch USA Today Network
 |  The Columbus Dispatch

A study of young adults in Portugal has found that the sense of anxiety and fear some experience when they cannot access their smartphone could be linked to general feelings of isolation and inadequacy.

Ana-Paula Correia, an associate professor at Ohio State University and co-author of the study, said she began researching the topic in 2014 as a professor at Iowa State University. She said that she and her students noticed the number of young adults using their smartphone beyond its initial purpose, which was talking on a phone using a mobile network.

“We were intrigued by that, and we wanted to make some kind of measure to indicate that people are actually stressed when they are not with their smartphone close by or in a situation where it can’t work,” said Correia, who works in Ohio

Read More

Anxious if smartphone not near? You’re not alone – News – The Columbus Dispatch

A study of young adults in Portugal has found that the sense of anxiety and fear some experience when they cannot access their smartphone could be linked to general feelings of isolation and inadequacy.

Ana-Paula Correia, an associate professor at Ohio State University and co-author of the study, said she began researching the topic in 2014 as a professor at Iowa State University. She said that she and her students noticed the number of young adults using their smartphone beyond its initial purpose, which was talking on a phone using a mobile network.

“We were intrigued by that, and we wanted to make some kind of measure to indicate that people are actually stressed when they are not with their smartphone close by or in a situation where it can’t work,” said Correia, who works in Ohio State’s Department of Educational Studies and is director of the university’s Center on

Read More